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Connected speech: 4-1-1 Elements of the rhythm of English

Introducing "English Pronunciation: the American Way"

English Pronunciation: the American Way  is available in the formats of e-book and the audio-book. The e-book is available on the Amazon site , and the audio book is available on the Google Classroom site. The Google Classroom site opens automatically once the purchase of the audio book is made. More information on the audio book can found here .     The audio book is the narration of the e-book.  The e-book is written by Nanhee Byrnes PhD, and the audio-book is narrated by John Byrnes PhD. 

Liquids /l/ and /r/ pronunciation

   /l/ and /r/ are called liquids since air flow is redirected and sent to different directions before exiting the lips. For /l/, imagine the tongue like a big rock in the middle of a little brook. The water stream is divided into two and moves around the rock. So is the airflow with /l/. For /r/, imagine the tongue like an odd-shaped rock that is under the water surface. The water will move around and over the rock. So is the airflow with /r/ around the tongue.  Liquids are some of the hardest sounds to pronounce correctly for non-native speakers. One important reason for this is that liquids are actually pronounced differently before and after a vowel in a syllable, but non-native speakers are often unaware of this fact. For /l/, the two different sounds are often called the light L and dark L. For /r/, the two different sounds are called the prevocalic R and vocalic R. We examine these different sounds of the same phoneme briefly.  English Pronunciation: the American Way Lateral liq