Skip to main content

Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *

4-2-1. /j/ and /w/ intrusion

Intrusion

Intrusion is placing an additional sound between two sounds. A well known case of intrusion is the use of a semivowel /j/ or /w/ to avoid hiatus. Hiatus, which means a gap, happens when we try to pronounce two consecutive vowel sounds clearly. To avoid the gap, we need to use a semivowel between two consecutive vowels. For example, in the phrase "he is," a small /j/ is added between the two vowels: “he/y/is.” This addition allows both vowel sounds to be pronounced fully and separately without pausing between the two words. If we do not add /j/ and continue the sound, it is not clear  whether we are saying “he is” or “his.” 


/j/ intrusion

We add /j/ sound before another vowel sound if a word ending in a vowel sound makes us move the lips sideways, as is common with high front vowels. 

I asked.  

I /j/ asked.


She always comes on time.

She /j/ always comes on time.


the end 

the /j/ end


in the evening

in the /j/ evening


pay attention

pay /j/ attention


my office 

my /j/ office 


/w/ intrusion

If a word ending in a vowel sound makes us move the lips forward, common in high back vowels, we add /w/ sound before another vowel sound.

Do I want to eat now?

Do /w/ I want to eat now?


Two of you are fine.

Two /w/of you are fine.


too expensive, too often

too /w/expensive, too /w/ often


Do it.

Do /w/ it.


Who is going to do it?

Who /w/ is going to do /w/ it?


I knew it.

I knew /w/ it.


How are you?

How /w/ are you?


Who is it?

Who /w/ is it?


Do all of them.

Do /w/all of them.


Comments